Baking something traditional: Marble Gugelhupf.

When I was growing up Sunday used to be the day when my whole family was at home and we could have lunch together as well as the traditional afternoon coffee with cake. Pretty early on my mom entrusted me with the task to bake the cake. I believe that this was the starting point for my love of baking and that had me buy a few too many baking books.

Years went by, the dynamics of my family changed as we kids moved out, I moved abroad for a while. This lead to rare Sunday meetings in my family and less cakes of course. However, this Sunday both my sister (+ her hubby) and I were at my parents’ and I decided that it was about time for me to bake something.

Marmorgugelhupf

Gugelhupf – also Gugelhopf or Kugelhopf – is a very traditional cake in Austria (but also popular in other regions in Europe) that is baked in the very distinctive circular Bundt mold. It is not exactly known where the name derives from, but the dictionary says that Gugel comes from the Latin word cucullus (meaning hood, boonet) and Hupf is ‘to hop, jump’ and refers to the rising of the dough.

Legend has it that Marie Antoinette, archduchess of Austria and Queen of France (the last one before the French Revolution though…), brought the cake from the alpine country to France. Also, during the Biedermeier period the Gugelhupf became very popular in the Habsburg rich. It was welcomed by the emperor Franz Joseph I. for breakfast and became a status symbol in the bourgeois circles.

gugelhupf_finished

There is not one definite recipe when it comes to Gugelhupf as it very much depends on the region, the occasion, and ability of the baker. It can be a yeast dough with raisins or a sponge mixture, ranging from very easy to very elaborate. The cake can be covered in chocolate (for birthdays), or just powdered with sugar.

One version that spices the traditional, easy (and sometimes boring) recipe a bit up is by transferring it into a Marmorgugelhupf – a marble cake – which is made by adding cocoa to some part of the dough. Not only does it add a different taste to the cake but enhances the appearance of the cake with the marbling.

What you need:

  • 4 eggs
  • 250 g powdered sugar
  • 250 g flour
  • 1/2 package (8g) baking powder
  • 10 tbsp. oil
  • 7 tbsp. water
  • 2 tbsp. cocoa powder

What to do:

First you need to separate the egg yolks from the whites. Mix the yolk, sugar, water and oil until you have a fluffy dough. Preheat the oven to 180Β°C and grease the mold. Then you have to beat the egg whites until stiff. Carefully fold in the stiff egg  whites and flour + baking powder into the dough. Put half or 2/3 of the dough into the mold, mix cocoa powder into the rest of the dough and put it into the mold on top of the first part. Bake the cake for around 45 minutes and then check to see if it is already done (by making the cake test with a thin skewer). Let the cake cool, turn it out on a plate and powder it with sugar. It is ready to be served – enjoy!

gugelhupf_cake_finished

gugelhupf_cake_finished_piece_

A few simple tricks:

Don’t be too hasty or impatient. Mixing yolk, sugar and so on to a fluffy dough takes some time. Sometimes mixing it for a longer period can help you making a fluffy and light cake.

Sift flour. In order to get a more even or a better result it helps when you sift the flour – especially when you add baking powder to the mix. It breaks up any lumps in the flour, is easier to mix into other ingredients, and helps to combine dry ingredients (such as baking powder) more evenly.

Milk can help. If the dough is too firm and not smooth enough you can always add a bit of milk (at room temperature) or milk substitutes. This increases the moisture and tenderness of the cake. But only add some at a time. Wait until you have mixed it long enough to see if it helped or if you need more.

Ovens differ. Not every oven is the same, so don’t strictly follow the heating and duration instructions. Some ovens take longer, some are faster. I followed a recipe in which it said that I should have it in there for 60 minutes, but it only took the cake around 45 minutes to be done.

gugelhupf_finished_coffee

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